Catalogue Finding NumberSH:7/ML/E/17/0165
Office record is held atCalderdale, West Yorkshire Archive Service
TitleDiary page
Description[Diary Transcription]

318
1835
February
U
U
I shall think about and perhaps do — then went into the house for a minute or 2 to speak about the affair
of Pickells the other day with the young man gathering sticks — said I should see Abraham and perhaps make
a new arrangement about the wood — Mr. Hemingway very civil — then into Yew Trees wood —
grieved over the quarry but said it was my own fault — no fault to find with Mr. Freeman — but
for the 3500 yards I had sold 2 or 3 times as much would be spoiled — if it was to come over again
I would have no quarry there — what I got would not pay me, at least for my annoyance to see the
wood so cut up — On looking at the bare ridge beyond it, from the Southholme side,
had told William to see if he could buy it for me of Mr. Thompson that I might plant it —
William agreed with that all the baring-stuff should be piled on the present mound without
spoiling more wood, and that the face of the stone should not be covered up — home by the high Brighouse road at
3 40/.. and sent William in to the kitchen to dinner — A- [Ann] had just had Cordingley who seemed so hurt I sent for her in to
the north dining room and had her from 3 40/.. to 4 1/4 — Marian seems to have managed her going away
woefully ill — I really had some pity for poor Cordingley and as she made all the amende
honorable she could to me, I said I should retract my saying she was ungrateful and that I should
never ask her to come here, and told her I should be glad to see her, but that so long as Miss Marian
was here I should consider Cordingley Miss Marian’s company, and would not interfere, but leave her
to manage for Cordingley as she thought best — wished Cordingley her health — and consoled her,
and I gave her a sovereign and A- [Ann] gave her 1/2 ditto — then out with William Keighley again at 4 20/.. cutting down
the large drying lime tree near the dry bridge — then with him in Trough of Bolland wood pruning while
A- [Ann] walked about in the new is-to-be approach road — sent off William Keighley at 5 1/2 and walked with
A- [Ann] till near 6 — then with Throp and his man and Pickells planting thorn in the Pearson Ing — then dressed — dinner at 6 35/.. — coffee — with my father from 8 to 9 — then had Oddy in
the library — Eugenie too intimate with Matthew — more her fault than his — explained a little about
Cordingley — told Oddy I was pleased and obliged by her telling me what she had done — would not name
it as she wished me not — but hoped she would pluck up spirit to keep Matthew out of the room —
she thinks Eugenie would have him if she could get him — then 1/2 hour with my aunt till 10 — then till 10 1/2
wrote all the above of today — very fine day Fahrenheit 46° now at 10 1/2 p.m. —

Wednesday 18
8
11 1/2
V
No kiss heavy shower at 7 — damp but fair at 8 Fahrenheit 44° at 8 50/.. a.m. out at 9 for 1/2 hour with Throp
and his man getting up thorns in hedge between Pearson Ing and coal pit field 3 of them planted this afternoon in the
coal pit field and one in the Lower brook Ing near the gate into my walk — and with Charles Howarth ordering about
Trestles for the drift-sinkers to run upon with their stuff to the Allen Car side of the dry bridge — breakfast at 9 1/2 —
then out again with Throp till came in at 11 1/4 — A- [Ann] had Mr. Adam to look over Hinscliffe’s lease of
the Newhouse coal that the holder of it Mr. Chew was to have brought at 11 but as he was not come at 12 so Mr.
Adam went away and I returned to Throp — called back again in about 1/2 hour to Mr. Adam and Mr. Samuel Freeman
the latter come in answer to my note of yesterday — very civil — would do as I liked; but, were the case his
own, he would drop it — Pickells so drunk when he went for the Summons, David Mallinson
would not grant it — a man of such character would not be attended to — said Pickles had come to me in


319
1835
February
V
the afternoon of the day (Monday) and I certainly did not perceive that he was drunk nor did Mr. Bradley perceive
who had to give him orders about some walling — However, I was satisfied to take Mr. Freeman’s advice —
In fact, I had nothing to do with that part of the wood of which I had sold the 3500 yards stone to Mr. Freeman
and should be glad enough to wash my hands of the business — I saw I had been wrong to send the summons in the 1st
instance — very ready to own this — and very glad to leave Mr. Freeman to do whatever he thought best —
he offered to try to make the men come and make an apology to me — No! said let them do it to you, and leave
you to settle it with me — all which Mr. Adam approved — Mr. Freeman begged I would not tell Pickles
what he, Mr. Freeman, had said — I promised I would not — but, smiled and said he shewed a white feather — Freeman said I did not
know what it was to have people to deal with as he had — a word at a public house might
do nobody knew what mischief — he had lost £5,000 by the union (turn out of the delvers)
and I did not know what a spirit was abroad in the country — Everybody was afraid of a man like Pickells —
I said as for that I would make no mischief but Pickles was the only man who could keep Trespassers off
the estate — it was only the hunters who had hitherto beat us; and Messrs Parker and Adam knew there was no
law against hunters — Mr. Adam said the law was certainly deficient in that case — Freeman was surprised but of
course gave way — staid about 1/2 hour till 2 — had wine — I said he might be assured that from this time I would
have nothing further to do with that part of the wood containing the stone sold to him, till such time
| as he had given up al claim to any right in it — that whatever people said he might be
| sure I would give no further orders about it — the fact is, as I think to myself that, be it as it may, the
| fellow Gill has cut down a part of the wood, however small, and taken away the stuff in spite of
| me, who can get nothing for it, and of Freeman who ought to pay me the value of the stuff however small
| that sum may be — But no matter — I shall learn in time — never sell stone again unless
| by the measured and set out plot containing so many yards or thereabouts; and when I put to let the upper
| Place quarry, if Freeman be the bidder I choose to take let him not have one square yard till he has
| given up all right and title to Yew Trees wood — Let Samuel Washington immediately measure and stake
| off the portion sold to Samuel Freeman and let me know what I now have left to myself — off with A- [Ann] to
Cliff hill at 3 1/4 — there from 4 5/.. to 4 35/.. Mrs. Carter there — Mrs. Ann Walker very civil — home at 5 20/..
then with Throp and his man 1/4 hour — and then had Jonathan Mallinson and his son — the latter will take
the Mytholm farm but thought the rent rather too great — well then, said I, I will lessen it by reserving the buildings and Ing they
stand in — and take Samuel Washington’s valuation for the rest or thereabouts for I had to the total valuation added about
20/. odd to make up £65 per annum — they thought he had got up in his valuation — I said that made
no difference — I cared little what he valued at, for I valued for myself and had made up my mind
before giving him any order to value the farm — some mention made of Dewhirst — said he
was not respectable enough for me as he was as present; and I would not let him the place (without land)
if he would give me £100 a year for it — though if he had married and become a respectable family man, he
should have had the place and I would have done anything I could for him — his mother had not behaved well in putting
in no ticket at the public letting and I would not take her as tenant — Had had Pickells about wanting throughs for
Staups wall before going to Cliff hill with A- [Ann] and Joseph Mann about how I intended hereafter to work the coal — dinner at 6 3/4
coffee — Left A- [Ann] with my father and came and wrote the above of today and had longish talk to Oddy about Eugenie till 9 3/4 — 1/4 hour with my aunt till 10 10/..

[margin text:] very fine day Fahrenheit 45° at 10 25/.. p.m.
Mr. Jubb came about 1 1/2 and rebound up my wrist —
all the lump of escaped synovial fluid absorbed —
DateFeb 1835
Extent1 page
LevelPiece
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