Catalogue Finding NumberSH:7/ML/E/10/0077
Office record is held atCalderdale, West Yorkshire Archive Service
TitleDiary page
Description[Diary Transcription]

148
1827
April Friday 6
6 55/60
11 40/60
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L
my bowels pretty well — did my hair — sent to Mrs. Barlow to say I should be with her soon after 9 — at my desk at
8 1/4 — wrote the other end (but did not date it, so that all appears to have been written yesterday) and finished my letter to Miss MacLean hers of 3 ppages and the ends and a few lines of crossing
shews she was hurt on receiving my last — Begs for the pages I mentioned having written but would
not send begs me write soon though it be the last time seeming to doubt whether I mean to continue
the correspondence ‘I am not I turust [trust] at this moment more unworthy of the friendship you bes
‘towed so freely on me than at the first moment of its existence unless continued increase
‘of affection deserves a repulse blame me find as much fault with me as you see me to deser
‘ve be ever candid and fear not any diminution of my regard however valueless you may con
‘sider it by this time’ — Some chance of Miss MacLean’s spending next summer in France but all
uncertain yet — my answer a very kind one — according to her request (say I have but 1 page left dated
25 February) give her almost the whole of this page containing what I had further written about the Quaker — and give her
the following about 1/2 the concluding sentence of the rough sheet or rather page I wrote 2nd March immediately on receiving hers of that day — ‘But
‘whither does my pen run on? my own pride has been wounded, and I have wounded yours — yes! here is the
‘secret; and ’tis out — when I sat down to write, I meant to conjure up ‘soft words’, apologize, and beg
‘forgiveness and excuse — my regard outwits me; and I love you too well to dissemble my mortification, and
‘not to write the thought, flattering or not, that starts into my mind’ — then observe ’Tis plain enough, had
‘I loved you less, I had annoyed you less ……. ‘the dream of the last years seems now to be fading away as the
‘light begins to shine on you — I always told you, you valued me too highly’ No! no! Sibbella, I have
seen a spectre in that dream, but am not yet awakened — I still slumber as before over all you tell
me about valuing you too highly’ …… we shall convince each other ‘our regard is not the less true, because
we have once in our lives given ourselves unnecessary uneasiness — heartily sorry for it — wish my last
‘had been differently written’ grieve over these ppages having hurt her ‘For my life, I could not at that time make
‘them better’ …. ‘How Albane and Margaret would look, could they have a notion of our last letters; but I think even these
‘would be preferable to receiving a cold heartless letter from you’ — A cold heartless letter! what have I done to force
‘upon you such a thought? Is my regard so light that the 1st breath of your displeasure can drive it thus like chaff
‘before the wind? Have I, then, worn but the mask of friendship? And is it now the moment to throw it down,
‘now when you are suffering so severely in health and spirits? My pen might be in fault; but to you,
‘at least, Sibbella, my heart was guiltless, and cannot change from tenderness to coldness so casually, or so soon —
‘Perhaps you will know me better by and by’ — mention the chance of my going with Mrs. and Miss Barlow (my aunt will
have me go) for a couple of months to Switzerland about the end of June — name Geneva, and ask if I am to give
her letter to her friend at Vevay — ‘I have not been quite well lately, and change of air, and a rummage are
almost necessary’ — my aunt says she does not want me — I can leave her quite well — so I can if she
continues well as she seems likely to do — on the last end write ‘Perhaps I ought to tell you in justice
‘to MacDonald, that we now acquit her of what I hinted at some time ago, and believe it is a natural not one
‘acquired silliness which makes her next to incomprehensible at times — However, in her present situation
‘(we have still but herself and George, — the latter has the care of all the rooms but my aunt’s), we are well enough satisfied;
‘for, perhaps, in this mixed capacity, we should not get anyone who would do better — I have written rather in
‘haste, determined to have my letter off by 1st post — God bless you, Sibbella! Do not doubt my regard, or that I am
‘always, and equally, your very sincere and affectionate friend AL [Anne Lister] — folded, wafered, and directed, my letter to ‘Miss Maclean of Coll
5 North Street, David Street, Edinburgh, Ecosse [Scotland], Post payé’ Slept breakfast at 9 35/60 — left my letter for
George to take to the post — and went out at 10 1/2 — Having sent to Mrs. Barlow to say I should be with her soon after 9, she, wondering what
detained me so long, sent Thérèse to inquire who arrived just as I was setting off — Mrs. Barlow and Jane and I off in a fiacre from

[margin text:] Fahrenheit 56° at 8 a.m.
63° at 10 1/2 —
63° at 10 1/2 p.m.
very fine sunny
morning — very fine
day — sunny and very
warm, yet a fine air.


149
1827
April

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the rue Royale to the barrière d’ Enfer at 10 3/4 — got out at the barrière at 11 1/2 — asked there what duty I should have to pay should
I bring at any time bougies from Antony — 3 1/2 sols per lb. — a continued street on the other side the barrière — soon after passing it,
on the left, the Hospice de Larochefoucauld [de la Rochefoucauld], a neat looking building with a sort of garden in front — by and by turned to
the rue to the Grand Montrouge — a pretty good village — an unfinished church built on the site of the old one — dedicated to
St. Jacques à pot, promising to be handsome — great entrance a flight of steps to a neat Ionic colonnade of 4 columns — close
to the church a door into the grounds belonging to the Jesuits — went down the street to their great entrance — went into the court — asked the porter
to let us take a peep at the grounds — no! nobody admitted but friends of the maitres (priests) or with some especial letter
to some of them — could not prevail — just looked at the outside of the house — 2 stories 8 windows at top 8 at bottom
but the 2 middle ones of the latter doors approached by a flight of 5 steps — a small place — several outbuildings round the
court, not particularly spruce and tidy — none of the ‘maitres’ at home just then — Left the house at 12 —
walked leisurely back (slowly on account of Jane) towards the great Orleans road — had not to go along it far before we turned
to the left down to Arcueil so completely buried in the valley we could not see a trace of it till just upon it —
a long street of a village — according to Galignani’s Paris guide of 1824. page 722. the church of the age of St. Louis
‘is remarkable for the delicate sculpture of its gothic porch, and for the interior galleries the area opposite the
‘porch is planted with trees, and at the extremity is a plain but elegant building occupied as a school upon the
‘Lancaster plan’ — the church so ill looking, that, the doors being locked, made no effort to get in — the better of
the 2 porches, whose ‘delicate sculpture’ is merely one row of rough gothic foliage by no means worth notice,
fronts the narrow street — the other shabby little porch is opposite the place, a small space formerly a burying ground from
which the trees were stubbed out some time ago — the school a decent small oblong building — the door shut — got to the
aqueduct at the end of the village at 1 25/60 — vide Galignani ppages 396-7. the ‘fine estate’, the property of a Monsieur
Coussin, very rich, is a pretty little campagne, or country house with a prettyish little garden and summer
house in front of the porte cochère formed by the old Roman arch — the small houses under the arches looking into
a little farm yard still remain — we stood talking some time to an old woman — Monsieur. Beurier, close to the aqueduct,
is the concierge, and a little girl went up the hill with us, and shewed us into the sort of reservoir — very neat —
fine run of water — walked a little way on the sloping roof of the aqueduct just at its commencement where near
enough the ground — Jane had already begun to be tired — her shoes hurt her — in returning through the village from the top
of the aqueduct good view of the Marquis de la Place’s nice looking house and grounds — the water of the
aqueduct passes under them in its way to Paris — the Marquise de la Place still there) — Mrs. Barlow bought 5 hard
boiled red stained as usual eggs, and 2 rolls for herself and Jane — returned to the Orleans — Jane had difficulty in getting
there — the sun warm — we had left the aqueduct at 2 and stood down under a tree at the side of the Orleans road at 2 1/2 —
here we rested 3/4 hour till at last not used to sitting out in this way I became asleep and tired and cold or coolish
after being much heated — poor Jane hardly able to get on at all — set off homewards 3 1/4 — walked very
slowly — how all this spoilt pleasure! we crawled through the barrière and 1/2 way down the rue d’ Enfer
not very far from the Place St. Michel before we met with a fiacre — all got into and got to Mrs. Barlow’s at 5 7/60 —
I meant to have had a warm bath at the bains Vigier — not time — must be at home at 7 — did not like to be
hurried — Mrs. Barlow kept me standing and talking — She lay down saw what she wanted at six lay down by her
and gave her a good grubbling she had a good kiss or excitement and I as usual pretended to sleep afterwards
to get rid of her questions who was the lady with the oil bottle that I used to oil it was poor Tibb of course will
never mention her name foolish enough to mention the circumstance which I now pretend to have quite for
gotten — got home from Mrs. Barlow’s at 7 20/60 — dinner at 7 20/60 — Left the dining room at 9 50/60 settled with George and my accounts
went in to wish my aunt good night at 10 1/2 and came back to my room to bed at 10 40/60 — o.. ~
DateApr 1827
Extent1 page
LevelPiece
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ReprodnNoteThis transcript has been created to allow keyword searching within our online catalogue. A full transcription (marked-up to show extended abbreviations and highlighting all coded extracts) can be found as a pdf version at the volume level entry SH:7/ML/E/10. Every attempt has been made to ensure the accuracy of this transcription, however, researchers are advised to check against the original diary images before quoting from the transcriptions. We are also happy to receive any corrections to improve the accuracy of the transcriptions if they are found. Further editing will also take place once the project nears completion. For further information about the transcription project see the Anne Lister Diary catalogue entry at SH:7/ML/E.
This transcript has been created to allow keyword searching within our online catalogue. A full transcription (marked-up to show extended abbreviations and highlighting all coded extracts) can be found as a pdf version at the volume level entry SH:7/ML/E/10. Every attempt has been made to ensure the accuracy of this transcription, however, researchers are advised to check against the original diary images before quoting from the transcriptions. We are also happy to receive any corrections to improve the accuracy of the transcriptions if they are found. Further editing will also take place once the project nears completion. For further information about the transcription project see the Anne Lister Diary catalogue entry at SH:7/ML/E.
ReprodnRightsNoteIMAGE USE AND LICENSING - Individual images of Anne Lister’s diary can be used on SOCIAL MEDIA for NON-COMMERCIAL purposes at no charge with an acknowledgement to West Yorkshire Archive Service. For a Twitter or Facebook post the suggested acknowledgement is ‘Image courtesy of @wyorksarchives’. For an Instagram post the suggested acknowledgement is ‘Image courtesy of @westyorkshirearchive’. Requests for other forms of reuse or publication should be directed to the West Yorkshire Archive Service for approval. Licensing or publication fees may apply. TRANSCRIPTION USE AND LICENSING - Copyright in this transcription remains with the West Yorkshire Archive Service. Researchers are welcome to quote from the transcription and we request that they acknowledge their quotes with the words ‘West Yorkshire Archive Service, Calderdale, SH:7/ML/E/10. For quotes on a Twitter or Facebook post the suggested acknowledgement is ‘@wyorksarchives’. For an Instagram post the suggested acknowledgement is ‘@westyorkshirearchive’. Requests for other forms of reuse or publication of this transcription should be directed to the West Yorkshire Archive Service for approval. Licensing or publication fees may apply. The web link for this transcription is https://www.catalogue.wyjs.org.uk/CalmView/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=CC00001%2f7%2f9%2f6%2f10&pos=1
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