Catalogue Finding NumberSH:7/ML/E/10/0016
Office record is held atCalderdale, West Yorkshire Archive Service
TitleDiary page
Description[Diary Transcription]

26
1826
November
+
§
from 12 1/2 to 2 1/4 wrote the above of today — Aired things — Read chapter 3 liber 1. Annals Tacitus I often take up this little edition
I bought a little while ago — the beautiful brevity of Tacitus always interests and instructs — my room full of smoke all the morning —
at last so hot — so uncomfortable, could bear it no longer and put the fire out — from 2 1/4 to 6, at the weekly summary
of our housekeeping expenses — Dinner at 6 10/60 — the porter’s wife came at 7 50/60 and staid till 9 3/4 — Thoroughly rainy
day — went to my room at 10 —

Sunday 12
7 35/60
11 1/2
Vc
§
§§
§§
§
My eye still much inflamed but rather better — in my salon at 8 1/2 — finished dressing — sat down at my desk at 9 1/4 —
at the weekly summary of our housekeeping expenses and nearly finished the last 8 weeks up to day — breakfast
at 10 20/60 — was musing over it when Mrs. Barlow came (about 10 1/2) and sat with me till 12 50/60 — during which time my
aunt came in for a minute or 2 to ask how I was — neither my throat nor my eye well enough for me to have read the
service — Not very barefacedly lovemaking but she understood me to be excited said she was afraid
she had very little hold of me when this was gone meaning excitement all would go kissed her now and then
but not roughly tears were often near her eyes or in them but she said she knew melancholy suited her
better than me Mrs. Barlow went to my aunt and sat 3/4 hour with her — then returned for a minute or 2 to me, and went away
at 1 40/60 — Told her she always excited me which never seems to displease her she said she did not do
anything to do so but would do as I liked meaning I know that she will yield to me if I desire it she bi
ds me prescribe what she is to do but no say I I will not do that if I die for it then she would blame me and I
know she longs to gratify herself and her own passions as well as mine she is always harping on my
having been constant to her for nine months declare I have always been constant ever since I kne
w her except for those few minutes at the tea table Mrs. Milne which she understands was at
Liverpool last July ~ gave Mrs. Barlow to send or put into the Post Office a note to Meunier to order 2 1/2 dozen
wine for tomorrow — At 1 3/4 sat down at the desk again — finished the summary from which it appears that for
the last 8 weeks, (not including wood nor any of the little pots etc. we had bought nor what M- [Mariana] and I used at the pastry cook’s but including charcoal) our average weekly expense has been
exactly 72 francs 11 7/8 centimes — I should wonder how it could have been had I not the accounts to produce — Afterwards
from about 2 1/2 to 5 1/2 ruling and making out a plan for a weekly summary book to contain on 2 leaves
the summary for a whole year, so that one may see it all at a glance — the book must be large; but
I think I shall manage it — this looking so thoroughly into my all accounts will do me good — then wrote
the above of today which took me till 6 5/60 — Dinner at 6 5/60 — came into the salon before 7 — Dozing and asleep all the
evening with my handkerchief over my face, for the cold airs in the room hurt my eye — Fine day —

[margin text:] Fahrenheit 54° at 9 a.m.
55° at 6 p.m.
— — 10 —
no fire

Monday 13
7
11 25/60
+
Settled with the washwoman came to my salon at 8 20/60 — finished dressing — sat down at my desk at 9 10/60 — Looking
over my account of income — breakfast at 10 1/4 read Galignani — at my desk again at 11 10/60 at which hour had my fire
lighted for Madame Galvani — looking over my accounts — Madame Galvani came at 12 1/2 (at which hour on account of the
smoke obliged to put the fire out) and staid till 2 3/4 — Conversation all the time — Should read Voltaire’s works, separating
the good from the bad — his comedies stupid — some of his tragedies very good — His Epic, La Pucelle d’ Orléans
should be read again and again — had its indecencies — but the best poem in the French language — Machiavelli not translated into
French except his advice to a Prince — Anquetil’s history of France a mere collection of dates (yet I must read it, I see) —
his work ‘Sur la ligne’ very good — while Madame Galvani was with me Madame Contant came — will get me the Merinos
etc. for Mrs. Lynn early tomorrow — An Italian came before Madame Galvani came with trinkets to sell — took his address and sent
him away — asked Madame Galvani respecting her husband’s family — not noble certainly — but ‘citoyen’ — ‘de la haute bourgeoisie’
of Bologna — not plebeian — nephew to the Dr. Galvani discoverer of galvanism — both uncle and nephew ennobled by Napoleon — wrote the above

[margin text:] Fahrenheit 53° at 8 1/2 a.m.
54° —11 —
— —7 1/4 p.m.
53° — 10 p.m.


27
1826
November
of today, and, at 3, sat down again to my accounts — from then to 6, entering in my ledger (blank till now, for
want of time) opening a ledger account (for the 1st time in my life — never till the last rent day thoroughly
understood how to keep a ledger account) and entering from the last rent day the account of 15 tenants
and that best of tenants the Calder and Hebble Navigation Company — Dinner at 6 1/4 — In the evening readded up
the whole of my receipts of this year and my expenses of ditto to the time of landing in France, and readded up all my own private
French expenses of the last 4 months of 1824 — Fine day — Began to rain heavily before or at 6, and rained more or less heavily
all the evening, with high whistling wind — Stormy evening — went to my room at 10—

Tuesday 14
7 40/60
11 40/60
L
N
N
Came to my salon at 8 40/60 — finished dressing — read Galignani — his paper this morning gives the prices of periodicals just received from England quarterly review 10/. Peerage 42/. etc. Breakfast at 10 5/60 — Looking over Lemprière’s
Classical dictionary — then wrote 1 1/2 ppages to Mrs. Lynn saying I had received her kind letter on Sunday week — we were much
grieved to hear so indifferent an account of her daughter — was at this moment writing to Mrs. Norcliffe copied the passage
respecting writing to congratulate Miss Marsh that was, and begged Mrs. Norcliffe to write to her and tell her this — say I went
on the Monday (yesterday week) to the woman who usually does these things for me and gave her the order for the merinos
etc. I felt myself unwell that evening (from cold caught I know not how) was confined to my bed a couple of days,
and have been confined to the house ever since, and must be a prisoner some days longer — considerable inflammation in my
right eye — see to write with difficulty — the woman promised to bring the things this morning early — past 11 and not come —
will send this letter of explanation — if the woman does not come today, will employ 1 of my friends tomorrow
and the things shall be sent off (tomorrow), by the Diligence from the rue Notre Dame des Victoires — write with pain — hope she will not have suffered any very great inconvenience by the delay — my aunt has been much better of late —
will only our best remembrances and wishes and ‘am my dear Mrs. Lynn very truly yours A Lister’ —
Sent this letter at 11 40/60 ‘ to Madame Madame Lynn, Place Grégoire, Tours’, and a little note to Mrs. Barlow saying
I felt I ought not to stir out — asked her to come and see me if she was well enough — at all rates, to let
me know how she was — Madame Contant came at 11 50/60 — too late to recall the letter — the merinos
that would suit 22/. instead of 18/. an ell — ordered it — all to be got, and packed, and sent off tonight —
tiresome enough the little woman did not come before — she promised to be here before 11 — sat down immediately and wrote 1 2/3
ppages another letter to Mrs. Lynn mentioning the circumstance — ‘I think it will what they call make up beautifully
‘If not, do have the goodness to scold me for offering to do what I am not able to do sufficiently well’ — sorry
‘there is so little chance for poor Louisa Sherard’ …. ‘but Mrs. Sherard is a person of strong mind ; and she will do, and feel
‘like one who has a hope beyond today’ — Shall be glad to hear good accounts of Miss Lynn — ‘Your account of
‘the Society at Tours is most inviting — my aunt is so materially better, and we are so comfortable here, we are glad
‘we did not move’ — wrote the above of today — all which took me till one — at which hour a little Note
from Mrs. Barlow to say it would be late before they had done with all the masters but she would see me sometime today —
‘I shall want the ticket I sent you’ i.e. Madame Galvani’s ticket stamped with the crown and 3 fleur de lis and round them
‘Direction General Des Travaux Publics de Paris’ the printed part ‘Direction des travaux de Paris.
‘Paris le 182 Les Gardiens de divers Ateliers compris dans la Direction des Travaux
‘de Paris laisseront entrer dans ces Ateliers Madame la Comtesse Galvani et sa société, La Maître
‘des requetés, Directeur des Travaux ……….. [The keepers of the several studios making up the the Division of Public Works give leave to allow entry into these studios Madame la Comtesse Galvani and her friends, by order of the Director of Works…] (I cannot make out the name signed the following places
to which one may be admitted are written

Ecole d’Alfort [School of Alfort].
Sourds-Muets [Deaf-Mutes].
Abattoir de [Slaughterhouse of] Montmartre
idem de [ditto of] Menilemontant
idem de [ditto of] Villejuif.
idem de[ditto of] Grenelle.
idem du [ditto of] Roule.

Ateliers. [Workshops]
Séminaire [Seminar] St. Sulpice
idem [ditto] Bonnenouvelle
idem [ditto] St. Denis
idem [ditto] Ste. Geneviève
idem [ditto] de la Madeleine

Bourse. [stock exchange]
Entrepot des vins.[Warehouse of wine]
idem des Sels [ditto of Salt]
Fontaine de la Bastille [Fountain of the Bastille]
Greniers de resérve [Reserve granary]
Arc de [Triomphe de] L’Etoile

Ecole des beaux arts [School of fine arts]
Colonne de la place Vendôme [Column of Place Vendôme
Ateliers de Sculpture [Sculpture Workshops of] Quai d’Orsai
Sorbonne.
Dépot de l’Octroi [Grand Depository]
Hotel rue de Rivoli
idem [ditto] Quai d’Orsai.

[margin text:] Fahrenheit 54° at 9 a.m.
55° — 6 p.m.
53° — 10 —
DateNov 1826
Extent1 page
LevelPiece
Thumbnail

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